– Highlights

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Mca Collection

MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday

01 Sep - 31 Dec

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Exhibition

Kader Attia

12 Apr - 30 Jul

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Exhibition

Jenny Watson

05 Jul - 02 Oct

– Learning Events

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Special Event

ARTBAR June 2017

30 Jun, 7.00pm, MCA

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Talk

NAIDOC Week 2017

05 Jul, 5.30pm, Level 2: Veolia Lecture Theatre

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Event

Master Class For Teachers

09 Jul, 10.00am, Level 3: National Centre for Creative Learning

– News from inside the MCA

5 Years of ARTBAR

Roaming carrots, Hummer limos, tea ceremonies and bikes in the galleries. Five years proof that anything can happen at #MCAARTBAR more

MCA at the 2017 Venice Biennale

Canals, cats and curators. Clothilde Bullen reflects on the experience of attending the 2017 Venice Biennale on the occasion of Tracey Moffat’s Australian Pavilion. more

From the archives: Unconventional Materials

From the Archives is our blog series unearthing gems from the MCA’s archives, written by resident archivist Stephanie Ferrara more

– Spotlights from the collection online

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MCA Collection

Works from the MCA Collection

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Collection Artist Interviews

Watch our latest interviews in the MCA Video Portal

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Joint acquisitions by MCA and Tate

The Program promotes Australian art globally, helping Australian artists reach new audiences.

Primavera 2016: Young Australian Artists

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA)

Duration

29 Sep 2016 to 04 Dec 2016

Artists:

Stephen Cybulka, Pia van Gelder, Biljana Jancic, Ruth McConchie, Adelle Mills, Mira Oosterweghel, Emily Parsons-Lord, Danae Valenza

Curator:

Emily Cormack

about the exhibition

Primavera 2016: Young Australian Artists presented the work of eight young Australian artists whose work highlighted the ways in which art can connect physically with the viewer, and how an artwork’s meaning can be generated by this bodily encounter. 
The exhibition drew on theories about 'embodied cognition’, a rapidly expanding field of cognitive science (the study of thought, learning and mental organisation) which puts forward the argument that the creation of knowledge might first begin in the body rather than the brain.

All of the artworks in Primavera 2016 were created especially for the exhibition. They all invited the viewer to experience them through a range of senses – not just vision – and through bodily actions such as breathing or felt sensations. In the exhibition, we breathed art into our bodies, mirrored it in our muscles and generated it using our bodies’ own radiant energy. The works were incomplete until the audience physically interacted with them.

Primavera 2016 imagined the gallery space as a body, with each artist representing a bodily system: respiratory, sensory, skeletal, muscular, endocrine (the collection of glands that regulate our metabolism, growth and development) and limbic. The exhibition began with the breath and ended with that most complex of all, the brain – the limbic system – that controls our instincts and our moods.

Primavera is the Museum’s annual exhibition of Australian artists aged 35 years and under. Since 1992, the series has showcased the works of artists in the early stages of their career, many of whom have gone on to exhibit nationally and internationally.

Primavera was initiated in 1992 by Dr Edward Jackson AM and Mrs Cynthia Jackson AM and their family in memory of their daughter and sister Belinda, a talented jeweller who died at the age of 29.

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