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Mca Collection

MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday

01 Sep - 31 Dec

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Kader Attia

12 Apr - 30 Jul

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Exhibition

Jenny Watson

05 Jul - 02 Oct

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Special Event

ARTBAR June 2017

30 Jun, 7.00pm, MCA

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Talk

NAIDOC Week 2017

05 Jul, 5.30pm, Level 2: Veolia Lecture Theatre

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Event

Master Class For Teachers

09 Jul, 10.00am, Level 3: National Centre for Creative Learning

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MCA at the 2017 Venice Biennale

Canals, cats and curators. Clothilde Bullen reflects on the experience of attending the 2017 Venice Biennale on the occasion of Tracey Moffat’s Australian Pavilion. more

From the archives: Unconventional Materials

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MCA Collection

Works from the MCA Collection

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Joint acquisitions by MCA and Tate

The Program promotes Australian art globally, helping Australian artists reach new audiences.

11th Biennale of Sydney: Every Day

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA)

Duration

18 Sep 1998 to 08 Nov 1998

Artists:

Vladimir Arkhipov, Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, Thomas Demand, Ding Yu, Margaret Robyn Djunginy, Henriette Heise, Gavin Hipkins, Ann Veronica Janssens, Patrick Killoran, Udomsak Krisanamis, Henrietta Lehtonen, Yuri Leiderman, Beatriz Milhazes, Ani O’Neill, Julian Opie, Platter/Clarke/Rodenrys, Joe Scanlan, Yoshihiro Suda, Rover Thomas, Pekka Turunen, Richard Venlet, Franco Vimercati, Zhao Bandi, Zhu Jia

Artistic Director:

Jonathan Watkins

About The Exhibition

The works selected in this Biennale were characterised by efficacy and unpreciousness. They were unforced artistic statements, incidentally profound observations on the nature of life as lived every day. Their impetus, derived from what is ordinary, was not unlike that which led 19th century French artists to their realist and subsequently impressionist positions. It was more human than spiritual, more empiricist than idealistic, more philosophical than ideological.

Although this Biennale sprung from a Western context, there was significant correspondence with a wide range of cultural traditions increasingly being acknowledged through a new internationalism. The curatorial approach was to attempt an understanding of the relativism of the every day, the differences between what is familiar, common or ordinary within the diversity of cultures represented. The aim was to communicate the nature of the every day and to be culturally specific, declaring differences without resorting to exoticism particularly in the presentation of non-Western art.