– Highlights

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Exhibition

Primavera 2017

23 Aug - 19 Nov

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Exhibition

Hilarie Mais

23 Aug - 19 Nov

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Mca Collection

MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday

01 Sep - 31 Dec

– Learning Events

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Special Event

ARTBAR September 2017

29 Sep, 7.00pm, MCA

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Workshop

Art Safari

10 Oct, 10.30am, Level 3: National Centre for Creative Learning

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Talk

Keynote lecture by Pipilotti Rist

05 Nov, 1.00pm, Level 6: Harbourside Room

– News from inside the MCA

Six Films that Changed My Life (for better or worse): Laura Hindmarsh

Primavera 2017 artist Laura Hindmarsh shares six films ahead of her specially curated edition of Art + Film on Saturday 16 September. more

The Many Guises of Jenny Watson

We’ll take you through some of Watson’s many alter egos that are currently housed in our Level 3 Galleries. more

Fresh picks for Father's Day

Discover the gifts that will help you spoil your dad this Father’s Day. more

– Spotlights from the collection online

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MCA Collection

Works from the MCA Collection

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Collection Artist Interviews

Watch our latest interviews in the MCA Video Portal

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Joint acquisitions by MCA and Tate

The Program promotes Australian art globally, helping Australian artists reach new audiences.

Blog – TABOO artist Anton Kannemeyer on his work and background

Posted on Jan. 21, 2013 in Curatorial.

Works by South-African comics artist Anton Kannemeyer (a.k.a. Joe Dog, born in 1967, Cape Town) feature in guest curator Brook Andrew’s group exhibition as part of the multi-faceted TABOO program. Click here to hear Kannemeyer discuss his experience as a white male Afrikaner under and post Apartheid. The artist also talks about the influence of Belgian comic book writer and artist Hergé on his work and describes Bittercomix, a magazine he co-founded with fellow Afrikaner Conrad Botes in 1992.

The following is an extract from Brook Andrew’s curatorial essay for TABOO:

'In his watercolours, Anton Kannemeyer provides views covering sports, prisons, corporations, genocide and cultural relations as a messy reality, but his African reality is no more or less messy than we might find on another continent.

(...) Perhaps Kannemeyer’s cartoon style artworks push similar buttons to that of the twelve satirical cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad published by Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005?

When Kannemeyer’s large works on paper Untitled (soccer) and Untitled (Rugby) (2012) are placed on a bed of fluorescent yellow and pink, the full energy of sports erupts off their surfaces. In the artist’s home country of South Africa, racial vilification in sport is still a highly volatile situation, an issue pushed further with his stereotyping the players’ heads as either ‘golliwog’ or ‘white man’ types. Racism in sport in Australia is a delicate matter. In 1993, Aboriginal Australian Football League player Nicky Winmar stood his ground in the face of mob racial vilification from the crowds in the grandstand. He lifted his jersey and pointed at his skin. There had never been a stand like this by an Aboriginal sportsperson taken at an A Grade match. The event was televised to thousands of homes, and became the turning point for attitudes towards racism.

(...) The politics of skin colour is just as fraught in Australia as it is internationally. Kannemeyer’s skin colour as a ‘white man’ presents a problem for those who say he is not entitled to comment on the black body.’

TABOO runs until 24 February 2013.

For more information on Anton Kannemeyer, go to his gallery’s website

For more information on the exhibition and events, go to the webpage

Posted by Kelly Stone